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Robbie Rogers lashes out at MLS right of first refusal policy; likely not headed to Fire?

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Robbie Rogers didn't even need to open his mouth to possibly alienate Fire fans; his keyboard did the talking on Monday.
Robbie Rogers didn't even need to open his mouth to possibly alienate Fire fans; his keyboard did the talking on Monday.
Drew Hallowell

Now this is what Twitter is good for.

As we all know by now, the Chicago Fire "officially" announced the trade that sends Dominic Oduro to the Columbus Crew in exchange for midfielder Dilly Duka, a move that had been rumored for a few weeks now. An interesting move by itself. But the deal also includes sending the Crew's first right of refusal for former midfielder Robbie Rogers, who was recently released by English Championship side Leeds United.

So the Fire either get a player they could use or trade bait, right? Not too complicated.

That is, until Rogers sent out this tweet on Monday morning after the deal was finalized.

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p>Just read my "rights" were traded to Chicago... Love how the MLS works, pretty funny.<a href="https://twitter.com/search/%23rightlessinthemls">#rightlessinthemls</a></p>&mdash; Robbie Rogers (@robbierogers) <a href="https://twitter.com/robbierogers/status/298480460336607232">February 4, 2013</a></blockquote>

<script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Yeahhhhh, that's going to fall pretty squarely in the column of "Things Fire Management really don't like." For some of their questionable acquisitions over the years, it appears the Men in Red brass have heavily weighted a player's character into whether they'd make a good fit for the team. It seems like they've done a good job of doing that, without going the way of the Chicago Bears, who are such a "family values" organization they won't allow cheerleaders on the sideline.

Rogers certainly has talent. Players don't typically make it in England (especially in the lower levels) unless they have a certain amount of skill and physicality. But blasting MLS is something that the league won't take well, and it's the kind of drama the Fire organization tends to avoid. It also hurts his trade value within the league, which might not sit well with Fire President of Soccer Operations Javier Leon.

What do you think about Rogers' critique of the league? Is it much ado about nothing or does it hurt your impression of one of the Fire's newest....erm...acquisitions.